COVID Vaccine Update

We and many other Practices have just been advised that we will not be receiving any Covid Vaccine supplies this week. We will therefore not be able to run covid vaccination clinics next week.

Emergency

In cases of emergency where immediate medical attention is required call 999 or attend your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.

Emergency healthcare advice is available from nidirect.

Examples include:

  • Chest pain (suspected heart attack)
  • Suspected stroke
  • Suspected meningitis
  • Anaphylactic shock (severe allergy)
  • Heavy bleeding or deep lacerations
  • Fluctuating levels of consciousness or completely unconscious
  • Difficulty breathing or stopped breathing with a change in colour
  • New seizure, fit or uncontrollable shaking
  • A child with fever and lethargic (drowsy)
  • A feverish and floppy (unresponsive) infant
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sudden, severe abdominal pain
  • Accidental or intentional overdose of medication
  • Trauma (including falls) and possible broken bones or road traffic accident.

What happens if I call 999?

If it’s a genuine emergency, where someone is seriously ill or injured and their life is at risk, call 999 and don’t panic.

Once you’re connected to a call handler, you’ll have to answer a series of questions to establish what’s wrong, such as:

  • Where are you (including the area or postcode)?
  • What phone number are you calling from?
  • What has happened?

This will allow the operator to determine the most appropriate response as quickly as possible.

Dialling 999 does not necessarily mean an ambulance will be dispatched. The call handler will decide what’s appropriate.

It may be safe enough for you to be seen elsewhere, or you can be given telephone advice by a medically trained clinical adviser.

An ambulance will be sent if it’s a life-threatening emergency.